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STARGATE: Reboot Movie Trilogy Planned by MGM and Roland Emmerich

Stargate

Stargate is getting rebooted. Roland Emmerich‘s Stargate is getting remade and the reboot will not be alone. If successful, the remake will be followed by two sequel films as well. Emmerich made the pitch to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) studios, which owns the rights to Stargate. Like a fledgling writer looking to break into the book market, Emmerich proposed a trilogy instead of a single film.

From a recent interview:

We went to MGM, who has the rights, and proposed to them to do a sequel, but as a reboot… and reboot it as a movie and then do three parts. Pretty soon we’ll have to look for a writer and start.

On whether Kurt Russell and James Spader would be apart of the project:

The actors look totally different… it would not work

On Stargate:

Stargate is an adventure military science fiction franchise, initially conceived by Roland Emmerich and Dean Devlin. The first film in the franchise was simply titled Stargate. It was originally released on October 28, 1994, by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Carolco, and became a hit, grossing nearly $200 million (USD) worldwide. Three years later, Brad Wright and Jonathan Glassner created a television series titled Stargate SG-1 as a sequel for the film.

In addition to film and television, the Stargate franchise has expanded into other media, including books, video games, and comic books. These supplements to the film and television series have resulted in significant development of the show’s fictional universe and mythology. In 2008, the films Stargate: The Ark of Truth and Continuum were released direct-to-DVD, which in total grossed over $21 million in Australia. In 2009, the original pilot was re-cut and released as a direct-to-DVD film. In 2002 the franchise’s first animated series, Stargate Infinity, began airing, which holds no canonicity in the franchise despite its Stargate SG-1-inspired plot. In 2004, the TV series Stargate Atlantis was released as a spin off from Stargate SG-1. A third series, Stargate Universe, premiered on October 2, 2009 and was cancelled during its second season, leaving it with an unresolved cliffhanger. Then on April 17, 2011, Stargate producer Brad Wright announced that any plans for the continuation of the franchise had been cancelled indefinitely, ending 17 seasons (354 episodes) of Stargate television production.

Leave your thoughts on Stargate being rebooted into a trilogy below in the comments section. For more Stargate photos, videos, and information, visit our Stargate Page, subscribe to us by Email, “follow” us on Twitter, Tumblr, or “like” us on Facebook. The Stargate remake has no US release date. When it does, we will let you know.

Source: Digitalspy

 

About the author

Rollo Tomasi

A Political Science and MBA grad who started FilmBook during an eCommerce B-School course in 2008. Cinema and TV addict. Former writer at Empire Movies, Blogcritics, and Alternative Film Guide. In addition to writing for FilmBook, he also edits the copy published on the website, manages its writing staff, manages the back-end operations, site finances, its social network accounts, and works with publicists, actors, and companies on press coverage and promotions. He has also created ProMovieBlogger.com and Trending Awards.com.

  • John Roberts

    I’ve been an avid fan of the Stargate movie (especially the Director’s Cut), as well as the first two television franchises. As entertaining as the TV series were, the insipid basis that the entire universe speaks English sort of ruined it, despite the fact that communication was not an insurmountable hurdle. Any race capable of building an intergalactic transportation system should be able to also incorporate some sort of communications element into it. The Russians had their own stargate program. I’d always assumed such a communications subsystem existed in the bloody things, but no — apparently the stargate canon officially says the entire universe speaks 20th Century English, so I guess the Russians have to speak English to operate their stargate, which is actually now our stargate (long story, don’t ask). All the writers had to do was was work a line into the script: “If we don’t have the yellow crystal, sir, we’ll be using sign language on the other end…it’ll be like Abydos all over again.” No further explanation would ever need to be given. I guess English being the universal language made more sense.

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