TV Show Review

TV Review: Californication: Season 3, Ep.3: Verities & Balderdash

californication-season-3-ep-3-verities-balderdash-header

Californication: Season 3, Ep.3: Verities & Balderdash. Front and center this episode was Jackie (Eva Amuri). “See that is a prime example of what is wrong with the younger generation. You leave nothing to the imagination. So you’ve got yourself some boobs. Some big, round, nice boobs.”  This is what is great about Hank Moody (David Duchovny). What is on the male mind comes right out of his mouth. No politcially correct filter. Californication: Season 3, Ep.3: Verities & Balderdash houses one of the most “entertaining” dream sequences you will ever see on a cable television show. I have seen Showgirls, Striptease, and Powder Blue and I believe this brief dance sequence in Verities & Balderdash beats all three.

Watching Hank sweet talk and drop his guard was cool as was Becca Moody (Madeleine Martin)’s examination of her home life and her effect on her parents’ lives. Hank is not perfect but he certainly knows how to make women feel special when he puts his mind to it. Can not believe he passed on Jackie (“With just the tiniest bit of  effort you could have had some one much younger and much hotter but better luck next time teach”) but the again he did not really try. 

californication-season-3-ep-3-verities-balderdash-1californication-season-3-ep-3-verities-balderdash-2californication-season-3-ep-3-verities-balderdash-3californication-season-3-ep-3-verities-balderdash-5

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe to us by Email or Full RSS Feed to be informed when we post new ones.

Related Articles:

 
 

About the author

Rollo Tomasi

A Political Science and MBA grad who started FilmBook during an eCommerce B-School course in 2008. Cinema and TV addict. Former writer at Empire Movies, Blogcritics, and Alternative Film Guide. In addition to writing for FilmBook, he also edits the copy published on the website, manages its writing staff, manages the back-end operations, site finances, its social network accounts, and works with publicists, actors, and companies on press coverage and promotions. He has also created ProMovieBlogger.com and Trending Awards.com.

  • shala

    I am going to stop watching this show. The writing is atrocious, it is unacceptable for a program’s writing to be called into question when its central character is himself a writer. How can a series evolve into something special when it revolves around an author who speaks mostly in cliches, and never seems to deliver any effective, thought-provoking line? Are we to believe that the guy is so troubled he is utterly incapable of saying anything inspiring? I mean, I am not even a writer, but even I utter more expressive, stimulating thoughts in a day than Hank Moody (David Duchovny) does in one twenty-eight minute episode.

  • I'm not. I have seen all three seasons. I'm in for the long haul. The writing is better than we get on many networks shows because on Showtime, the characters can say whatever they want and its truer to life.

    Are authors meant to inspire verbally or on the written page? Isn't the blank page their arena where they speak their mind?

  • I'm not. I have seen all three seasons. I'm in for the long haul. The writing is better than we get on many networks shows because on Showtime, the characters can say whatever they want and its truer to life.

    Are authors meant to inspire verbally or on the written page? Isn't the blank page their arena where they speak their mind?

Send this to a friend